Chip Griffin

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Chip Griffin is an entrepreneur, communicator, and technologist. He helps PR and marketing communications agencies grow and prosper.

Start your agency’s 2019 budgeting with a revenue retention forecast

Understanding the status quo can be a good start to the 2019 budget process for many agencies.

How your agency can benefit from multiple revenue models

A well-designed multiple revenue stream model can mitigate risk, improve cash flow, and generate greater profits for your agency.

Does it take more than two to tango when it comes...

When two people start a business, it’s a heady time. Unfortunately, that excitement often blinds the new partners to good decision-making. At the top of that list is 50-50 ownership and control.

Diversify your client list for a stronger agency

You don't want to put all your eggs in one basket as you grow your agency. Variety in your client base will make your firm more robust and profitable.

The six biggest PR business mistakes I’ve made

Failure provides valuable lessons. An agency owner shares practical advice he has learned along the way from his own errors.

Questions agencies should ask before redesigning their websites

I frequently work with clients to redesign their websites. We find it very important to guide a conversation at the start of the process...

How to build accurate PR agency project budgets

Successful public relations executives understand the need to focus on project profitability, but how exactly do you do that? It starts...

Questions solo PR pros must ask before hiring first employee

As someone who has grown several businesses, including turning solo PR practices into ones with employees (as well as choosing not to...

PR project managers need to understand profitability

Many agency project managers don’t fully appreciate the business side of their work. Communicators are used to counting clips, but they need to be just as comfortable counting beans.

The value of checklists

There’s a reason why pilots and others in life-and-death roles rely on repeatable checklists to ensure things get done right. They help us to avoid the tendency to cut corners when we're in a hurry.